Tyson V. Rininger's Blog

TVRPhotography – If it moves, Shoot It!

Tag Archives: Google

To Enter, or Not to Enter Social Networking Photography Competitions

Social NetworkingIn an attempt to gain readership, or as one of the more popular social networking sites call it, Followers, many organizations are creating photography contests whereby the winners are those with the most votes. Viewer’s Choice, Popular Choice, Public Choice, all names given to the top photo awarded by these organizations.

Unfortunately there are more reasons not to avoid in these contests than there are to partake and hope for the best. Assuming the rules of the competition are agreeable to both parties and the organization isn’t planning on a rights grab from all entrants, most participants will have an uphill battle in securing the top spot regardless of how amazing their image may be.

The most common social networking site to conduct these popular vote contests is Facebook and the image with the most ‘Likes’ wins. But getting those ‘Likes’ is more about how many people you know and how much you can share your own image against others doing the same.

There are plenty of resources that describe Facebook’s algorithms and how they share posts with friends, fans and followers. Posts that include links are viewed far less frequently than posts with only an attached image. So, sharing a link to your image will garner fewer views than posting the image alone. Additionally, posts are distributed to viewers based on their most recent and relevant interests, which may not include your posts.

Along with finding ways to cheat Facebook’s algorithm, contestants will also have to compete against others who may have a larger following or be more adept to other social networking sites such as Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Google+ and more.

What it all comes down to is that Popular Choice contests really don’t focus on the ‘best’ image, but rather the most savvy social networker. Besides the individual who eventually gets the most ‘Likes’, the only real winner is the agency hosting the competition. After all, you worked very hard to send everyone to their page.

Archiving Can Be Fun! Ok, not really….

Untitled-1It’s that thing we do when we’d rather be out shooting. First you dive into the really cool shots you created editing the best of the best to share with the world. Then you take a wee bit more time to scour through the thousands of rejects to find the obvious winners only to go through them all one more time to single out those with potential. Once everything has been separated, the editing and archiving process begins. But it shouldn’t end there.

All those supposed rejects that we hold onto for that ‘just in case’ scenario still need a little love. This is where I hope I can help.

Everyone’s archiving techniques are different and none of them are wrong so long as you are able to find what you’re looking for quickly and efficiently. If that’s not the case, maybe my system can offer a few ideas.

My system is very simple. I archive my digital images the same way I archive my slides and negatives. I never lose touch of the original file or frame number. A photo of an A380 taken at Airventure in 2011 will look just like this:

osh11_a380_1234.tif

It denotes the location; Oshkosh, the year; 2011, the subject; A380, and the original file name assigned to it by the camera; 1234. I can even add a few more descriptive notes to the file name such as manufacturer or another aircraft that may also be in the image, such as an Airbus A330. It would look something like this:

osh11_airbus_a380_a330_1234.tif

Why might I choose to be more descriptive with a file name? A little thing called SEO is reason enough for me. Search Engine Optimization is the core tool used by Google, Yahoo, Bing and other companies to find appropriate images, links, websites and more. The more descriptive I can be in the file name, the better chance I have of my images showing up in a consumer search. It goes without saying Metadata and Keywording is also extremely important, but I’ll save that for later.

Now that you have a library of edited images with keywords built right into the file name, searching for the appropriate shot should go a lot quicker.

But what about all those rejects? Same thing. Before I even begin editing photos, I batch rename everything! I personally use Adobe Bridge, but this can be done in Lightroom as well as Aperture. Batch renaming will allow you to search your entire hard drive, whether the images have been edited or not, for that perfect image for which the client is seeking but may have not seemed relevant at the time.