Tyson V. Rininger's Blog

TVRPhotography – If it moves, Shoot It!

Tag Archives: apple

iPad Portfolio App Comparisons for Photographers

iPadWith the sudden proliferation of quality iPad portfolio applications on the market, I wanted to figure out which one(s) would suit me best. In doing so, I realized my research had become rather extensive and to the point of potentially becoming a resource for others. Although there are dozens of iPad portfolio apps available, I felt confident narrowing it down to these eight based on consumer feedback, overall price and features. Because of the incredibly fast advancement in technology and software, this article is probably going to be out of date before it can even be posted. The information here is as of April 25th, 2013 and includes the version of each featured application.

FolioBook

FolioBook (Version 3.3)

Perhaps one of the most frequently reviewed applications, the creators of FolioBook have listened to their viewers and continue to make updates placing them amongst the best portfolio apps on the market.

The creators of FolioBook have worked closely with some of the top commercial photographers to create a highly customizable portfolio that can be loaded onto multiple iPads for maximum exposure. Content can be hyperlinked and layout can be designed to fit the look of your business in both portrait and landscape mode.

When creating a portfolio, up to 200 images can be imported at a time and either a still image or a video can be used as the custom splash screen with the added option of an overlaid company logo. Users can choose from 70 different font styles along with varied text color and transparency as well as supplied background textures and motion graphics. Included are four types of transitions as well as the ability to email an image to a client directly from the portfolio with or without copyright information.

Video support can be added through an in-app purchase of $1.99 and customer support is made easy through the application’s main website.

UPDATE: For users of Photoshelter, FolioBook is now integrated with the popular image hosting website for greater ease of syncing images and modifying a portfolio. More information can be found here: FolioBook now integrated with Photoshelter.

Review by Scott Kelby
Review by BestAppSite

PadFoliosPadFolios (Version 2.0.1)

Creator, Juan Pablo Mazuera set out to develop not only a versatile portfolio application for photographers and graphic designers, but a presentation interface that can be put to use by just about anyone. A resident of Columbia, Juan is a 27 year-old graphic designer and photographer who found the iPad lacking that perfect app to showcase his images, so he created one and called it PadFolio.

One of the few portfolio applications that works on both the iPad and iPhone, Padfolio is completely customizable with the added option of creating up to 30 different portfolios, each with their own look and containing up to 400 images per gallery. During the portfolio creation process, the application automatically saves your work so there is no need to worry about remembering to save as you go and if you choose to remove photos from your device library, it will not remove them from the application. The customizable splash screen can be locked in order to prevent a client from accessing user tools and any file type that can currently be used on an iPad can also be imported into the application.

Currently version 2.0.1 lacks the function of an automated slideshow as well as the ability to sync a presentation with music, but these features are currently in the works and should be available in the next update. Until then, music can be played in the background by making use of iTunes and the iPad’s multitasking feature.

http://www.padfolios.me/home.html
Apps for iPads Review (Version 1.5)

Portfolio for iPadPortfolio for iPad (Version 3.03)

Portfolio for iPad is another highly customizable application that puts your business at the forefront of the viewer’s attention. Besides having the ability to import images through iTunes, this application can also sync with a Dropbox account for greater versatility and ease of updating. The uniquely designed splash screen and galleries can be locked as well as shared on multiple iPads. Additionally, user portfolios can be streamed to a larger monitor through Apple’s Airplay functionality.

The application is compatible with most types of media including still images, video and audio and allows use of either pre-designed themes or completely customized layouts featuring your business attributes. Viewers can either manually scroll through images or use an automated slideshow complete with background music if so desired and view a portfolio in both landscape and portrait mode.

http://ipadportfolioapp.com/
BestAppSite Review

MediaPad ProMediaPad Pro (Version 2.0)

If you plan on showcasing multiple types of media, MediaPad Pro may be the best choice for you. Designed for use by photographers, videographers, designers, directors and anyone else looking to share a portfolio, this application boasts having support for the most diverse types of files.

After your content has been imported through iTunes, MediaPad Pro allows for adding personal and business information to a customized splash screen or your choice of one of five different background images included within the application.

When creating your presentation, you can choose any color scheme from the supplied color palate as well as fonts, transitions and adjustable timing to better coincide with any supplied background music. What sets this application apart from most others is the ability to offer a guestbook allowing you to increase future business potential.

http://www.medlmobile.com/apps/ipad/mediapad-pro
Professional Photographer’s Mag Review (Version 1.2)

Minimal FolioMinimal Folio (Version 1.2.1)

Minimal Folio is just as it sounds, a basic portfolio application without too many bells and whistles void of an automated slideshow and music. While this can present itself to be a good thing, absolute customization of your portfolio to reflect your business look may be a deal-breaking compromise.

Despite its minimalist approach, the application will allow syncing through Dropbox and will accept most image files as well as .PDF and video files. Users can manage multiple portfolios and like most of these types of applications, lock the device to prevent viewers from accessing the underlying management tools.

At $2.99, Minimal Folio won’t break the bank if you’d like to give it a spin. An additional .99 will allow you to download the iPhone version.

http://www.simonheys.com/minimalfolio/
BestAppSite Review

XtrafolioXtraFolio (Version 2.2.2)

Another versatile, yet pricey portfolio application is Xtrafolio. The application allows for images to be downloaded through Dropbox, iTunes or from the iPad’s existing photo library. Once images are contained within Xtrafolio, captions and subtext can be added based on the user’s input or the existing metadata. Like most portfolios, the splash screen can be customized and locked as well as skipped altogether if the photographer or viewer wants to skip directly to the images.

Xtrafolio allows for an unlimited number of galleries and an unlimited number of images and videos within each gallery. The application also allows for nesting, or folders within folders within folders. Slideshows can be enhanced with added music and each portfolio can have its own tunes. A big plus is having the ability to keep multiple iPads up to date when making changes to the application on the designated master device. Should the view become interrupted during the course of a portfolio slideshow, the application has a ‘Save State’ feature that allows the viewer to return to the place where they left off.

http://www.xtrafolio.com/
BestAppSite Review

FlexFolioFlexFolio (Version 1.4)

Developed by fine art photographer, Emmanuel Faure and fashion photographer, Antoine Verglas, FlexFolio has gone through an immense growth process since its initial introduction. Originally priced at $24.99 for the first version, it was later dropped to $14.99 and can now be had for .99 through the iTunes store.

The application allows for multimedia files including still images, videos, audio files as well as Word and Excel files should the user wish to include an existing price list or complex biography. Another feature of the application is the ability to include unique business cards or contacts within each portfolio. This feature would be most appropriate for photographers who contract to outside sources whereby sharing a mutual copyright or concerning a business partner.

Unfortunately, after reading multiple reviews, the application seems to lack an ease of use and despite some reviews claiming it also works on the iPhone, it is an iPad only application. But, if you’re willing to put up with the learning curve of how the application operates, you can’t beat the price.

iPhoneography Review

PadPortPadPort (Version 1.0.1)
Designed as a minimalistic portfolio application, PadPort offers the basics to getting a portfolio on your iPad. Currently there are only two themes available to base your portfolio around, “Essential” and “Mnmlst”, both incorporating a single font; Century Gothic.

As with most portfolio applications, the splash screen can be customized with your unique information, but still needs to be designed around the included themes and can then be locked in what the creators call “Kiosk Mode”. The application allows for up to seven portfolios containing both still image files and video files. Batch loading of images through iTunes was recently added to the application speeding up the import process.

A negative I have learned of, and have not found any updates to the contrary, is where upon start-up of your portfolio, a splash screen appears from the creator of the application. This appears to be the only portfolio application that puts themselves ahead of the photographer.

http://padportapp.com/
JonathanJK Review

This chart represents information available about each iPad Portfolio Application listed in this blog as of April 25, 2013. Details are subject to change as individual applications are periodically updated.

This chart represents information available about each iPad Portfolio Application listed in this blog as of April 25, 2013. Details are subject to change as individual applications are periodically updated.

Advertisements

Think Different

I don’t often share my Apple Store experiences with anyone outside Apple even though I regularly have some pretty amazing interactions with customers. Quite frankly, with Apple’s intense secrecy I’m not sure I’m allowed to, but it would be a shame not tell this story.

Although this may seem like another Apple Feel-good saga, and in a way it is, if you’re reading this blog for photography related material, you’re still in the right place. Hang in there, it will all come together.

Wandering through a sea of aluminum computers and solid wood tables, an elderly couple attempted to interact with these relatively alien devices. The husband appeared a little more lost than his wife, but that was only because she was the one who had an interest in a new computer. He couldn’t care less.

She and I talked for a bit while her frail husband continued to meander around the store. Another staff member brought out the desktop computer she wanted along with all of her fun accessories. We unpacked the computer together and with the help of another Apple associate, began the process of setting up the basics and making the computer her own.

Her husband sat down at the same table but at a distance and alone, still appearing lost as he curiously watched other people in the store. I moved a bit closer to him and began a completely unrelated conversation so as to occupy a bit of his time and not make him feel ignored. We got onto the topic of how computer savvy younger kids are today and how quickly they pick up on technology. He asked if working at Apple was all I did. I told him my primary job was that of a photographer and I mainly photograph airplanes. He laughed a little.

“I don’t understand,” he said. “A plane is a plane, a car is a car and a cow is a cow. How can you make a living taking photos of these ordinary things?” To relay my best customer service, I agreed and told him that’s a very good question. “If the photos I create look just like the objects I photograph, I would no doubt have a very difficult time making a living,” I told him. “The challenge is to make every aircraft look unique but familiar and bring out the strongest feature of that plane.”

I could tell he was a very objective man and doubtful that a simple photograph could make an ordinary object look extraordinary.

On the table was a 15” MacBook Pro laptop. I navigated the web browser to my gallery of Reminisce black and white photographs and proceeded to show him some of my photography. What happened next was nothing short heartwarming.

The fragile older gentleman’s eyes began to water as he watched image after image flash before him. I asked if he was ok. He glanced over at his wife, then back to the screen followed by a simple nod. After a few more seconds and without provocation, he started to tell me a very powerful story. “I was at Normandy and remember seeing these planes. They didn’t look like this,” he said. “I have few words to describe what I saw and what I experienced. Come to think of it, it’s been nearly 30 years since I’ve even talked about Normandy.” Another lengthy pause followed as he watched the slideshow intently. “These are beautiful,” he said. “You’re right, a photograph of an airplane can look a lot different than just an airplane.”

I was speechless. Not only did I suddenly have a better understanding of his objectivity, to him at the time these aircraft were simply tools of war, but I had so many questions and was poised to listen intently to his stories if only he were willing to share them. At that moment however, I could sense the sight of these aircraft seemed a bit overwhelming. The fact that he was willing to open up to me and share a piece of his past that he hadn’t shared with anyone in three decades almost brought a tear to my eye.

He continued to surprise me as he named off the individual aircraft. “I jumped from quite a few of those C-47’s,” he recalled. “I also remember seeing those white stripes on the wings for the first time [referring to the D-Day invasion stripes applied to all allied aircraft]. They painted hundreds of them that way.” He went on to describe the actions of P-38’s and P-51’s in the European Theater. For someone who managed to distance himself for so long from such intense experiences, his memory was flawless.

Soon his wife was all set and her computer was back in the box. He and I both thanked each other for the shared stories and shook hands. I watched as they walked hand in hand toward of the front of the store and then out of sight. What really caught my attention was how his once frail shuffling steps turned into a more confident stride. Moments like these remind me of why I do what I do, both at Apple and as a photographer.

As an artist, it is my job to show an ordinary object in a way it has never been seen before. What I don’t expect are for the resulting photographs to convey an emotion, especially one that effects me just as much as the viewer. While Apple’s privacy policy prevents me from mentioning the gentleman’s name, it is one I’ll never forget. It is an experience I’ll never forget.

To some, winning a contest defines a good photo. To others, selling a print defines a good photo. To me, nothing could define a good photograph more than a single tear.

Be different, think different, make your mark.

How to Price Your eBook

With the ever growing popularity of the tablet, anyone who has ever dreamed of publishing a book now has the means. Owners of iPads, Kindles, Tabs, Nooks, and others are purchasing eBooks at a record pace due to their portability and environmental conscientiousness. But who would have predicted the actual creation and implementation of an eBook would be the easy part?

Pricing a book used to be relatively easy. Take all the parts of the book like printing costs, marketing expenses, advances and other author related fees, publisher fees, distribution fees and desired profits, add them up, divide by the number of printed copies, end it with a ‘5’ or a ‘9’ and voila, you have a price. With eBooks, some of that process is still in place, but there is no longer a physical book along with printing costs, or distribution fees and thus the basis of pricing is flipped on end.

Regardless of the size or amount of time you've spent on your publication, the consumer will only spend what they feel the eBook is worth.

In many ways, the growing eBook industry has much to learn from the digital photography business. When film disappeared, photographers needed to find a new way of justifying prices based on an intangible product. Customers at first didn’t understand why they were paying the same price, if not more, for a digital image when the expense of film was no longer a part of the process. As most photographers know, the price of technology skyrocketed, the responsibilities of processing film simply transferred from the lab to the photographer and storing images digitally on hard drives replaced the cost of purchasing film.

Producing an eBook is no different. Instead of a publisher working to lay out the book, the author now does the work. Although a publisher may no longer incur the expense of printing the book, the author may instead be tasked with hiring a pre-production company to digitize and troubleshoot any layout inconsistencies. And of course there’s time invested.

Those looking to get their books published have been eased into the market through ‘Print-on-Demand’ publishing companies like Blurb, Flickr, Lulu and CafePress just to name a few. Unfortunately these markets allowed little room for profit but enabled new publishers a base from which price from.

The eBook market has no standard. Typically ‘How-To’ books are priced higher than your fictional love story so in the online world, entertainment isn’t quite as valuable as information. Expect to pay about $2.99 for an entertaining novel by an unknown writer versus $7.99 and up for an informative ePub.

The consensus to arriving at a competitive price comes down to what you want out of your project. Selling an eBook is no different than selling anything else in this world; there are pros and cons.

People will tell you to price your work at next to nothing so you can sell hundreds, thousands, even millions of copies and possibly make a profit from bulk sales. Others will suggest taking a loss so you can get your name out. And still others will claim testing the market by setting a high price only to gradually lower it until sales improve is a great way to operate. Unfortunately all of these have a downside.

We all dream of selling millions of books, so do the other millions of people who have uploaded their books. Selling your book for nothing or next to nothing will still get you nothing. Why not make a little money while your name gets out there? After all, we’re talking about a digital book, not a physical one that people will share with their friends. If your book is good, they will email their friends about it and your book will go viral regardless of the price, so long as it’s a reasonable one. And gradually lowering the price of your book will only lead to upset buyers who purchased your book when it first came out. Remember, those buying your book are still customers and you want them to eventually buy more books, so don’t burn your bridges with poor customer service.

With that in mind, keep your pricing economically viable. In other words, it may be unrealistic to get $29.99 for your book just because you’ve invested six months to a year of your time in its creation. That kind of pricing may need to be saved for the physical copy and your eBook price may have to drop to $4.99. It’ll be a hard pill to swallow, but eventually worth it.

To best figure out what your book is worth, do a little homework and check out other books similar to yours featured on eBook sites. The more unique your publication, the more people will pay for that knowledge.

The most important part, check out your competition. If you’ve completed a stellar cookbook, check out other highly rated cookbooks with similar content and structure and price your book accordingly. If this happens to be your first book, price it slightly lower than authors with multiple books. Research has shown that up to 80% of consumers that have purchased one book from a particular author will go on to purchase additional books by that same author if they like the work. So, pricing your first eBook slightly below theirs may put you on the same level playing field and at least get readers to acknowledge your skills.

So why end in ‘5’ or ‘9’? Most of it is psychological and if anyone has ever been shopping, you know the psychology works. Would you rather buy something for $19.99 or $20.00? Furthermore, many of the eBook distributors require a pricing structure that ends in $.95 or $.99. Apple’s iTunes, for example, happens to require an ending price of $.99.

And don’t forget, you don’t get to keep all the dough. Suppose you print a book through Blurb and then submit it to iTunes. Blurb will keep their operating cost, about $1.40 and Apple will keep about 30% of the purchase price. If you’re selling a novel marketed through Amazon’s Kindle, pricing it at $2.99 or above will enable you to keep 70% of the profit, but if you price it below $2.99, you only keep 30%.

Most importantly, don’t underprice yourself. Your knowledge and ideas are valuable. Just spend some time doing a bit of homework and browsing the eBook store to get a better idea of what the market will bear for titles similar to yours.

And congratulations on becoming an author!